fbpx
855-236-0600

All Hands 2021 Award Winners

2021 Award Winners

Congratulations to these Associates for their recent award at the FocusCFO All Hands meeting.

Client for Life Award

Gold Level

Don Cain

CFO, Central Ohio

Tom Flynn

Area President, Central Ohio

Dan Bloom

CFO, Central Ohio

Client for Life Award

Silver Level

Pat Lang

CFO, Central Ohio

Jeff Lacy

Area President, Central Ohio

Jim McKinney

CFO, Central Ohio

Client for Life Award

Bronze Level

Ric Butler

CFO, Central Ohio

Don Cain

CFO, Central Ohio

Darren Cherry

Area President, Central Ohio

Jim Collins

Area President, Southwest Ohio

Scott Davis

CFO, Southwest Ohio

Mike Derringer

Area President, Central Ohio

Jon Doerer

CFO, Michigan

Jeff Farrington

Area President, Michigan

Tom Flynn

Area President, Central Ohio

Peter Geise

CFO, Central Ohio

Greg Gens

Area President, Northern Ohio

Jim Gilbride

Area President, Northern Ohio

Jeff Lacy

Area President, Central Ohio

Pat Lang

CFO, Central Ohio

Jim McKinney

CFO, Central Ohio

Bob Palmerton

CFO, Michigan

Todd Peter

CFO, Northern Ohio

Kyle Rhodebeck

CFO, Central Ohio

Jeff Semple

Area President, Northern Ohio

Skip Vermilya

CFO, Northern Ohio

Mark Vernallis

Area President, Pennsylvania

Todd Whetstone

CFO, Northern Ohio

Lynette Zody

CFO, Central Ohio

CFO Hall of Fame

Gold Level

CURRENT MEMBERS

David Bourke

Director, CFO Services

Bruce Collen

CFO, Central Ohio

Pat Lang

CFO, Central Ohio

Lynnette Zody

CFO, Central Ohio

CFO Hall of Fame

Silver Level

NEW MEMBERS

Sherif Matar

CFO, Central Ohio

CURRENT MEMBERS

Dan Bloom

CFO, Central Ohio

Don Cain

CFO, Central Ohio

Jim McKinney

CFO, Central Ohio

Jim Zins

CFO, Central Ohio

Joe Dougherty

CFO, Central Ohio

CFO Hall of Fame

Bronze Level

NEW MEMBERS

Ed Chong

CFO, Central Ohio

Bob Palmerton

CFO, Michigan

CURRENT MEMBERS

Wendy Brugmann

CFO, Northern Ohio

Will Cooper

CFO, Central Ohio

Dean Cole

CFO, Central Ohio

Kathleen Ferry

CFO, Northern Ohio

David Gouttiere

CFO, Northern Ohio

David Green

CFO, Central Ohio

Todd Peter

CFO, Northern Ohio

Jim Rowlands

CFO, Northern Ohio

Bob Stecki

CFO, Central Ohio

Skip Vermilya

CFO, Northern Ohio

Scott Lee

CFO, Central Ohio

Walter Himmelman

CFO, Northern Ohio

Scott Davis

CFO, Southwest Ohio

Richard Murch

CFO, Central Ohio

Ric Butler

CFO, Central Ohio

Area President Awards

Rookie of the Year

Michael Stier

Area President, Carolinas

Area President Awards

Rising Star

Lesli Matukaitis

Area President, Michigan 

Mitch Willis

Area President, Pennsylvania

Area President Hall of Fame

Gold Level

NEW MEMBERS

Forest Bookman

Area President, Northern Ohio

CURRENT MEMBERS

Mike Derringer

Area President,
Central Ohio

Tom Flynn

Area President,
Central Ohio

Jeff Lacy

Area President,
Central Ohio

Jeff Semple

Area President,
Northern Ohio

Jim Gilbride

Area President, Central Ohio

Area President Hall of Fame

Silver Level

NEW MEMBERS

Jim Collins

Area President, Southwest Ohio

Bob McAdams

Area President, Central Ohio

CURRENT MEMBERS

Darren Cherry

Area President,
Central Ohio

Fred Dannhauser

Area President,
Northern Ohio

Peter Geise

Area President,
Northern Ohio

Bob Miller

Area President,
Central Ohio

Area President Hall of Fame

Bronze Level

NEW MEMBERS

Mark Vernallis

Area President, Pennsylvania

David Tramontana

Area President, Pennsylvania

CURRENT MEMBERS

Jeff Farrington

Area President,
Michigan

Bob Miller

Area President,
Central Ohio

Greg Gens

Area President,
Northern Ohio

2020 Continuous Learning Award

Exit Planning Institute – CEPA

NEW MEMBERS

Kim Cooper

CFO, Carolinas

Mark Clower

Area President, Southwest Ohio

Michael Stier

Area President, Carolinas

Randy Feger

CFO, Pennsylvania

Mike Derringer

Area President, Central Ohio

Greg Gens

Area President, Northern Ohio

David Green

CFO, Central Ohio

Lesli Matukaitis

Area President, Michigan

Jeff Farrington

Area President, Michigan

Tom Bartos

Area President, Pennsylvania

Forest Bookman

Area President, Northern Ohio

Bob Palmerton

CFO, Michigan

Mark Rust

CFO, Pennsylvania

Peter Geise

Area President, Northern Ohio

Rex Bevis

CFO, Southwest Ohio

Lynette Zody

CFO, Central Ohio

VETERANS

David Bourke

Director,
CFO Services

Darren Cherry

Area President,
Central Ohio

Mark Clower

Area President,
Southwest Ohio

Kathleen Ferry

Area President,
Northern Ohio

Tom Flynn

Area President,
Central Ohio

Jim Gilbride

Area President,
Northern Ohio

Brad Martyn

Visionary and Founder
FocusCFO

Jeff Semple

Area President,
Northern Ohio

FocusCFO Logo 2021

855-236-0600

Mind the Gap

Mind the Gap

By Michael Stier

Many business owners wonder how much their business is worth and how they stack up against their competitors. Take the traditional “country club valuation,” for instance: A group of four business owners goes out on a Sunday to play a round of golf. One owner has just closed a deal and sold their manufacturing company for millions of dollars. A fellow golfer, who owns a business in the same manufacturing space, thinks, “I could probably sell my company for that.” But what should the business owner sell their business for? What are the owner’s personal and financial goals? 
When talking about buying and selling companies, many business owners get caught up in the purchase price, when the real number they should be focused on is net proceeds. The “net proceeds” of the sale refers to the cash the owners get at the close after taking care of all expenses, such as investment banking and transaction fees, accounting and legal fees, debt from the business, holdbacks and earnouts, seller financing and, of course, taxes.

Although the net proceeds number is critical to determine what your business should sell for, it is only part of the equation. Net proceeds help establish the three financial gaps in your life. Those gaps are the solution to deciding what your business must be sold for in order to live a fulfilled life after exit. 

The Three Gaps: Wealth, Profit and Value 

When thinking about selling your business, timing and what it would fetch, ask yourself the following questions: 

• What do I want to do after I sell? And do I have the money to do it? I.e., Wealth Gap 

• What are the best-in-class businesses in my industry earning? How far is my business from that profit margin? I.e., Profit Gap 

• How valuable is my business if I sold today? If I took it to market right now, would it fetch anywhere near what best in class businesses in my industry might? I.e., Value Gap 

Let’s review each of the different gaps in detail. 

Wealth Gap 

Your wealth gap is the difference between your current wealth and the amount you need in order to live the life you want. To understand your wealth gap, you need to investigate your personal goals and ambitions outside of the business. For example, an owner who wants to own a minor league baseball team in the next phase of their life will need more funds than an owner who wants to retire and live quietly on an old farm. 

Your goals, family, extended family and personal ambitions should all be considered. Once identified, you can determine your wealth gap. Your net worth outside of the business plus the value of your company today equals your goal. In other words, if your goal was $10 million and you had $2 million of assets outside of the business, your wealth gap would be $8 million. 

Profit Gap 

Using this example, the next step in the process is understanding if the business today is, in fact, worth $8 million. To get to the root of this, you can start by calculating your company’s profit gap. At a very high level, a profit gap is calculated by understanding the best-in-class earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (known as EBITDA) of businesses in the same industry. Next, assess your current EBITDA performance. 

The profit gap then is calculated by understanding how you can drive toward best-in-class performance by subtracting your company’s current EBITDA performance from the best-in-class EBITDA performance. For example, if your company is currently earning $1 million in EBITDA while the best-in-class companies are generating $3 million in EBITDA, your business currently has a $2 million profit gap. 

Value Gap 

This EBITDA number is then applied to the sale price of the company. Small and lower middle-market companies sell in a range of industry multiples dictated by the private capital market. For example, upon research, a plastic manufacturing company could be selling in a range of multiples from one times the EBITDA to six times the EBITDA, with the best-in-class companies selling at the higher range. 

Given the same industry research, you will be able to identify your company’s value gap. The value gap takes into consideration the best-in-class performance and applies it to your company in its current state. For example, if best-in-class companies are performing at 15% EBITDA to revenue and the current business owner’s company is performing at 10% EBITDA to revenue, the company could improve performance, even at the same level of revenue, and generate another 5% in EBITDA. 

To illustrate this further, imagine a company currently generates $20 million in annual revenue. At 15% EBITDA, this company would generate $3 million in EBITDA, whereas at 10% EBITDA, the company would generate $2 million in EBITDA. Given 15% EBITDA is best-in-class performance, these companies would sell at the best multiples. In this example, if best-in-class companies are selling at six times the EBITDA, that would be an $18 million sale price. An “average” company performing at 10% EBITDA, on the other hand, would likely sell for an average multiple. Let’s assume that multiple is 3.5 times the EBITDA, which would equate to a $7 million sale price. This represents a Value Gap of $11 million between two companies with the same revenue! 

Key Takeaway:

Selling your business involves a lot of strategy, advisors and planning. But without considering your personal goals as well as business value, you will have a hard time determining if you and your business are ready and what your ideal sale price may be. 

Michael Stier is an Area President for FocusCFO based in Charlotte, NC. 

Founded in 2001, FocusCFO is the leading onsite fractional CFO services provider in the Midwest and Southeast. FocusCFO works closely with small to medium sized businesses helping business owners gain control over three key financial and operational areas: increasing cash flow, reducing business risk, and creating a platform for scalable growth. This allows business owners to then realize full financial control and increased value in their businesses. For more information, follow us on LinkedIn.

FocusCFO Logo 2021

855-236-0600

Speeding Along but Out of Gas (Cash)

Speeding Along but Out of Gas (Cash)

By Michael Stier

Michael Dell, the founder & CEO of Dell Technologies has oft admitted, “We were always focused on our P&L. But cash flow was not a regularly discussed topic. It was as if we were driving along, watching only the speedometer, when in fact we were running out of gas”.
Like Michael Dell, many small to medium size business owners are laser-focused on profits. However, that’s not enough to truly be successful. I am often asked by many successful owners, “We’re making money, so why is there no cash in the bank?” It doesn’t matter whether they have a $1M or a $50M business, many owners struggle with the concept of profit vs. cash. Understanding that difference is critical to understanding how cash flow works — and employing a CFO to master the practice of proper cash flow management for the business can pay for itself many times over.
It’s important to understand:

Your business can be making a profit but still have a negative cash flow.

Your profits won’t equal your cash if you:

1. Did work/sold product but didn’t get paid yet (increase in Accounts Receivable)
2. Paid for things, like payroll, before you got paid
3. Made investments for the future (e.g.,buying inventory)

Some Best Practice Ideas for Cash Flow Management

  • Calculate Gross Profit Margin
  • Implement Job Costing
  • Understand Your Fully Loaded Labor Costs
  • Measure DSO
  • Delay in Payroll Start by 2 Weeks
  • Automate Invoicing
  • Get Paid in Advance (If Possible)
  • Get A Deposit Upfront
  • Set up a Retainer
  • Bill Weekly Instead of Monthly
  • Bill Milestones, if not Weekly
  • Bill Immediately at Project Completion
  • Assign a Collections Owner
  • Automate Collections
  • Call clients 5 Days Before Due Date
  • Prepare for Collections calls
  • Fire Low Margin Clients
  • Sort A/R Aging by Amount Due
  • Semi-Monthly vs. Biweekly Payroll
  • Accept Credit Card Payments
  • Establish a Written Credit Policy; Check
  • Background, Rating & References
  • Audit Expenses
  • Implement Pay Slow Rule
  • Experiment with Your Pricing Model
Read on for further detail on some of the listed best practice ideas above:

Gross Profit Margin

Gross profit margin provides insight into:

1. Are you pricing your jobs right?
2. How do cost overruns impact profits and cash flow?
3. Which sales reps or marketing campaigns generate the most profits?

Implement Job Costing

The biggest benefit of true job costing is knowing that nothing slipped through the cracks and you’re getting paid for all the value that you delivered.

Understand Fully Loaded Labor Costs

Understanding your true fully loaded labor cost will help make sure your proposals and price quotes achieve your target gross profit percentage. Having visibility into real costs allows you to include details of all your value and time spent in your proposals.

Measure Daily Sales Outstanding (DSO)

DSO measures the number of days it takes to collect a dollar of sales. Every day that you’re doing work that your client hasn’t paid for upfront, you’re essentially giving that client a loan. The easiest way to reduce DSO is with timely billing through lightning-fast invoicing, and fast payment incentives like keeping a credit card on file or shortening net terms for payments.

Automate Invoicing

One of the most important ways to improve cash flow is to map out the steps involved in getting a bill out the door. Ask yourself questions like:

1. How many people are involved in creating an invoice?
2. Once you’ve completed a job, how long does it take to get the invoice into the clients’ hands?

Bill Weekly Instead of Monthly; or Bill Milestones

Billing weekly can significantly improve the timing of payments. According to Vistr, if you issue invoices on the same day each week, the data suggests you should send invoices on the weekends to get paid faster. Whereas invoices sent on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays take a full 10 days longer to receive payment.

Get Paid in Advance or Deposit Upfront

Getting an upfront payment or deposit that covers your out-of-pocket costs will completely change your company’s cash flow.

Assign a Collections Owner and Prepare for Collections Calls

A bad collections process will lead to unnecessary cash flow problems. Collections are often the last
thing anyone wants to do, so often times it rarely gets done well. Don’t assign collections to a receptionist or office manager unless you’ve made it clear where it fits on the priority list and given them sufficient time to do it right. One quick way to improve collection performance is to train your staff to anticipate what the client might say when you ask, “When can we count on you to pay your bill?”

Audit Expenses

If you can cut expenses by 10%, the effect on your profits will be exponential.

Experiment with Your Pricing Model

You should put more thought into optimizing your pricing model, as this will have the biggest impact on cash flow. Consider the pricing model that fits best for your business: Value-Based, Fixed Fee, Time & Material, or Milestone Driven. So how do you optimize your pricing model to increase your company’s profitability? You turn to your Dashboard and look at the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). KPIs should help you figure out if you are pricing your jobs right, and also to help you to really understand who your most profitable clients are, and what makes them profitable.

Do you see practices above that you should be implementing, but not sure how? FocusCFO can help. It is very common for our CFOs to create detailed cash flow models for our client’s businesses and implement customized cash flow improvement practices.That allows our clients to know and understand their numbers, and have the confidence that comes with proper cash flow management.

Michael Stier is an Area President for FocusCFO based in Charlotte, NC. 

Founded in 2001, FocusCFO is the leading onsite fractional CFO services provider in the Midwest and Southeast. FocusCFO works closely with small to medium sized businesses helping business owners gain control over three key financial and operational areas: increasing cash flow, reducing business risk, and creating a platform for scalable growth. This allows business owners to then realize full financial control and increased value in their businesses. For more information, follow us on LinkedIn.

FocusCFO Logo 2021

855-236-0600

Do self-surgery? Self-sell Your Business?

Do self-surgery? Self-sell Your Business?

By Michael Stier

Should I Sell My Business Without an Advisor? Should you remove your appendix DIY, without a surgeon? You could. But it will likely be an unnecessarily painful process and the outcome sub-optimal. Allow me to create a useful mental image…. using some of the top self-surgery movie scenes. Recall Tom Hanks doing his own dental surgery in The Castaway. Matt Daman, in The Martian, removing shrapnel from and stapling his abdomen. Similarly by Keanu in John Wick. Denzel repairing his slashed leg in The Equalizer. If these don’t make the point, watch Arnold in The Terminator cut open his forearm then remove his left eye. [Point made?]

Optimizing the sale of your company should not be a DIY undertaking. A business sale is complicated, not a do-it-yourself activity. Business owners can and often do a lot themselves, I certainly did. But this is not the time to learn by trial and error – you often only get one shot. And the downside to achieving your goals – both personal and for your business – is too great.

The riskiest thing you can do: The most complex transaction you will ever likely engage in is the sale of your business. Selling your company by yourself, your life’s work, is just too risky. This is true from a legal perspective and a financial perspective. And when most of your net worth is tied up in the company, you cannot afford big mistakes as you work on exit planning.

Engaging a professional team to help you sell will maximize the sale price AND net proceeds, optimize terms, develop a succession/ transition plan, prepare you (and your family) for the personal adjustment, guide you through the options and details of estate & retirement planning, and minimize the risks inherent in taking such a complex transaction through completion. That’s just some of the highlights. Exit planning is very much a team sport, comprised of many specialists. And don’t forget the single most important role… the coach/ coordinator, your trusted Sherpa, who orchestrates when to bring these other specialists on the field and what they should do, for your behalf.

One client example: the first offer that came was a business value at about 30% of the number now under discussion. On their own, the client may have taken that first offer up by 100% — but they would most likely not, on their own, have moved it up more than 200%. Investing in the right advisory team, and head coach, will help you maximize what you walk away with for retirement, or whatever your ‘next chapter’ may be.

Michael Stier is an Area President for FocusCFO based in Charlotte, NC. 

Founded in 2001, FocusCFO is the leading onsite fractional CFO services provider in the Midwest and Southeast. FocusCFO works closely with small to medium sized businesses helping business owners gain control over three key financial and operational areas: increasing cash flow, reducing business risk, and creating a platform for scalable growth. This allows business owners to then realize full financial control and increased value in their businesses. For more information, follow us on LinkedIn.

FocusCFO Logo 2021

855-236-0600

Yes, You Can

Yes, You Can

By Michael Stier

Yes, You Can was a 2001 short film shown at the Royal Premiere of Moulin Rouge in Leicester Square. Its core message was about overcoming seemingly insurmountable challenges through a less than obvious solution. And in the case of this film, with a sprinkle of slapstick comedy.

Yes, you can …. afford a CFO, the topic of this post, presents a perhaps less than obvious solution for some of the challenges faced by entrepreneurs — the Fractional CFO model. It’s a quick read, in a Q&A style format.

Scaling a company comes with decisions that may feel beyond your scope of expertise, and for many entrepreneurs they are. You’re an expert at many things, but likely not all things.

Q: Why do business owners neglect to bring on such a critical addition to the team? 

Beyond simply not knowing that they need a CFO, they don’t want to spend the money. What many entrepreneurs don’t realize is that they’re already spending that money in lost profits and misspending. 

They’re not seeing the dynamics of the business from an educated financial point of view. You can’t always go with your gut in making financial decisions, which is what a lot of entrepreneurs try to do. 

Q: What does it cost a business when the owners avoid bringing on a CFO? 

The lack of a CFO’s direction leads to many lost opportunities to price your products and services properly, to manage your inventories better, and to separate good customers from bad customers. 

There are many hidden costs in doing business, such as the cost of maintaining a demanding client. Its margin on variable costs may be the same but because of the additional management time and hand holding it’s different. 

It’s hard to see without actually running the numbers, which many people don’t really know how to do. 

Q: Is there a revenue mark or headcount that determines when a business owner should look for a CFO? 

Consider bringing on a fractional CFO when you need to do critical forward planning–when your business is up and running with many spinning plates, but you’re not sure where to take it next. 

At this point you need someone to make sense of the financials. The only person who truly understands the economics of a business–what actually makes it work–is a chief financial officer. 

You have some data, you know who you’re serving and what they are buying, but your CFO will help you understand your business and the overall dynamics better than you ever thought you would. They will help turn the data you have into information and actionable insight. 

Q: What else will a CFO do for the company? 

He or she will peel back the onion, at which point you’ll most likely find that you’re not making money in one or more areas of your business. It’s not unusual for a company to be losing money and have no idea where it’s going. 

A CFO will take a magnifying glass to your numbers and look at staffing and other expenses vs. revenue. When they examine things like manufacturing costs and sales cycles for products, it gives you the information you need to calculate an accurate ROI. 

A CFO is also in charge of the financial future of a company while maintaining the past. The bills have to go out, invoices collected, cash managed, payroll paid, and new business ideas have to be vetted. A good CFO will analyze a new structure and how to model it. 

The accuracy of the model is key. Calculating the revenue alone won’t give you accurate information. You must know the exact costs of doing business so that when you take on new business categories, they can be designed make a profit. 

Q: Why can’t an accountant or bookkeeper do the job? 

Most firms start out with a tax return person. A classic accountant who is in charge of the rear-view mirror. The only period of time being examined by an accountant is the past year, which is a bit late for decision making, and only at the level of detail needed to satisfy the IRS. The accounting firm has only 

your tax return in mind and classically assigns expenses to categories that are only appropriate for your tax return and not for running a business. 

A regular bookkeeper records all transactions and perhaps even helps with sending invoices and collecting money. While the bookkeeper handles payroll and helps file tax findings, you’re not getting actionable, forward-looking information. 

Q: Aren’t most CFO’s overqualified for my business? How can I afford one? 

The opportunity with so many baby boomers who want to remain in the workforce is enormous and includes a large community of highly experienced chief financial officers. The fractional CFO model is a win-win relationship. Your business benefits from their extensive experience, at a fraction of a full-time CFO. Average engagement is 1 or 1/2 day per week. From the CFO’s perspective, they benefit from the intellectual challenge of working with several businesses simultaneously as well as having greater control over their work schedule. 

At FocusCFO, we are passionate about small business. If you’d like to learn more about how we can help, let’s have a conversation. 

Michael Stier is an Area President for FocusCFO based in Charlotte, NC. 

Founded in 2001, FocusCFO is the leading onsite fractional CFO services provider in the Midwest and Southeast. FocusCFO works closely with small to medium sized businesses helping business owners gain control over three key financial and operational areas: increasing cash flow, reducing business risk, and creating a platform for scalable growth. This allows business owners to then realize full financial control and increased value in their businesses. For more information, follow us on LinkedIn.

FocusCFO Logo 2021

855-236-0600

There Are Two Kinds of Business Owners:

There Are Two Kinds of Business Owners:

those who PLAN to exit…and those who HAVE to exit.

By Michael Stier

Clint said essentially the same thing… “In this world there’s two kinds of people, my friend: Those with loaded guns and those who dig. You dig.” From the 1966 epic Spaghetti Western, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’.

In both cases, it’s far better to be of the first kind than the second!

Often in life, we wait until a change in circumstances to make a big decision. Exit planning is an example of something so many entrepreneurs put off. In business, our focus is firmly on the here and now decisions: marketing, HR, inventory, cash flow, etc. It doesn’t feel like there is the time or the impetus to create an exit strategy, especially if you don’t plan to sell soon.

But you can’t be complacent about exiting your business. The earlier you establish your exit strategy, the clearer the vision for you and your company becomes. If you don’t believe preparing is a priority for your business right now, allow me to share 10 reasons why your Exit Strategy should be as important as your Business Plan. 

10 Reasons Why Your Exit Strategy Matters

 

  1. It will change how you guide your company’s future 
  2. You will know how to handle unsolicited offers
  3. You will understand your company’s value
  4. You will know when you intend to sell
  5. Your business will become more appealing to buyers
  6. It will help you mentally prepare to exit
  7. You’ll be able to capitalize when there is an active market
  8. You’ll be prepared for the volumes of paperwork involved in exiting
  9. You’ll be prepared for potentially intensive negotiations
  10. It gives you control for life after this business

It’s Never Too Early to Plan Your Exit Strategy

An exit strategy sets the wheels in motion for the journey beyond your business. Planning early gives you greater insights into your company, a plan for the future, and a means to add value between now and the day you decide to depart. Because….there are two kinds of business owners:
Those who are value creators…and those who have a lifestyle business.

Again, it is far better to be in the former group than the latter. Value creators understand
that focusing on VALUE drives all positive outcomes!

Not convinced yet? Reflect on these alarming statistics1 in the context that 60-90% of owner wealth is tied up in their business.

  • 80% of businesses put on the market DO NOT SELL
  • 70% of family businesses DON’T SURVIVE into the 2nd generation
  • 50% of owner exits are INVOLUNTARY
  • 75% of owners who did exit were PROFOUNDLY UNHAPPY with the outcome 1 year later

Having an exit plan, perhaps most importantly, secures the future you envision for yourself, your family and your business.

In summary…. When it comes time to exit your business…. Do you want to be the one with the loaded guns, or the one who digs? 

Michael Stier is an Area President for FocusCFO based in Charlotte, NC. 

Founded in 2001, FocusCFO is the leading onsite fractional CFO services provider in the Midwest and Southeast. FocusCFO works closely with small to medium sized businesses helping business owners gain control over three key financial and operational areas: increasing cash flow, reducing business risk, and creating a platform for scalable growth. This allows business owners to then realize full financial control and increased value in their businesses. For more information follow us on LinkedIn. 

FocusCFO Logo 2021

855-236-0600